THE CRUCIFIXION (2017) BY XAVIER GENS

Reviews

Director: Xavier Gens
Writers: Chad Hayes, Carey W. Hayes
Year: 2017
Starring: Sophie Cookson, Corneliu Ulici, Brittany Ashworth

Synopsis:
When Nicole comes in contact with Father Anton more and more inexplicable events occur. The pair begin to believe that the priest lost the battle with a demon.

Review:
French director Xavier Gens (FRONTIER(S); HITMAN; THE ABCs OF DEATH) returns to directing after a brief hiatus with this Romanian set satanic mystery which was written by American duo Chad and Carey Hayes (HOUSE OF WAX; THE REAPING; THE CONJURING; THE CONJURING 2) who bring with them a recognisable if slightly safe horror pedigree.

Like many supernatural or satanic horror films the film claims to have been inspired by true events, in this case it is the 2004 “Tanacu Exorcism” in which a nun died and Father Daniel Corogeanu was convicted of murder. Inspiration taken this results in the opening pre-title sequence comprising of a priest and a group of nuns forcibly handling a distressed woman, pinning her down onto a cross as the priest attempts to deliver an exorcism which we soon learn went wrong resulting in the death of the afflicted woman and the arrest of the Priest who performed the unsanctioned act.

It doesn’t take long for news to spread across the globe and journalist Nicole Rawlins (Sophie Cookson) seizes this opportunity to push her own anti-religion agenda by begging her editor, and inconsequently Uncle, to give her this story to which he reluctantly agrees on the basis that she maintains at least some journalistic objectivity.

Arriving in Romania, it is clear that Nicole is a fish-out-of-water but thankfully this approach isin’t one that is pursued but rather a more intriguing retrospective investigative narrative. This choice for the opening act works well as it provides all of the relevant exposition without having to have just one character sit down and talk at us for a good five minutes as sometimes happens with this sub-genre of film.

Furthermore it is refreshing for a film to not just be all about the cattle-prod scares and rather than being just another low-substance, high-jump throwaway horror, there are elements that are more reminiscent of demonic mysteries such as CUSTODES BESTIAE or THE NINTH GATE. That is not so say that THE CRUCIFIXION is not packed with jump scares, only that they do not define the film and are at least supported at times by genuine tension.

As the film starts to progress it relegates the incarcerated priest and the dead woman to the background shifting focus to Nicole’s own crisis of faith and as her sanity seemingly decreases the jump scares increase, but thankfully on the whole they work even if a few are a little telegraphed at times. No doubt the increased frequency was to ensure that mainstream horror audiences, that most likely picked the film up due to the marketing blurb pushing recent hits ANNABELLE and THE CONJURING being plastered all over the films promotion, did not feel shortchanged.

Overall thanks to the initial investigative approach and moments of real tension, THE CRUCIFIXION manages to differentiate itself enough from its peers and in the process provide a more engrossing and complete viewing experience than had it relied solely on its use of derivative jump scares and its generic look, in which even the rural Romanian setting could not make the cinematography stand out – after all there is always a farm, a barn and a church in these films.

If you are looking for a decent modern entry into the exorcism genre then THE CRUCIFIXION is for you, it won’t make your top ten of the year but equally won’t be a complete waste your time.

SLUGS (1988) BY JUAN PIQUER SIMON

Reviews

Alternative Titles: Slugs, muerte viscosa; Mutations; Salingaria tou tromou; Slugs – Vorice d’orrore
Director: Juan Piquer Simón
Writers: Jose A. Escriva, Juan Piquer Simón [Based on a novel by Shaun Hutson]
Year: 1988
Starring: Michael Garfield, Kim Terry. Philip MacHale, Alicia Moro, Santiago Alvarez

Synopsis:
The townsfolk of a rural community are dying in strange and gruesome circumstances. Following the trail of horrifically mutilated cadavers, resident health inspector Mike Brady is on the case to piece together the mystery. He soon comes to a terrifying giant slugs are breeding in the sewers beneath  the town, and they’re making a meal of the locals!

Review:
Based on the novel by Shaun Hutson, the author would go on to say in an interview with thisishorror.co.uk that the “film isn’t great… but it’s not the worst film I’ve ever seen in my life” and this is not surprising as the film makes several distinct changes to the writers novel. To which its sequel Breeding Ground was also due to be adapted but unfortunately never was. 

Onto the film itself and we are greeted by water bubbling in an isolated still lake as a bickering couple argue in a small row boat. The young man, fishing, falls in while his nubile partner begins to panic when he doesn’t immediately resurface. This aquatic creature feature is, you’ve guessed it….Slugs: The Movie!

With the opening credits and the seemingly pointless lake scene over we are transported to the town of Lyons as a bunch of youths speed past the local down and out Ron Bell who pretty soon also succumbs to slimy critters and sets the scene for the films reasonably high body count.

Although be warned it is not only death that litters this film but also inconsistencies and dodgy dialogue, no better exemplified by the first interaction between our lead protagonist, town health inspector Mike Brady and the local asshole Sheriff Reese.  As the reluctant duo travel in a cop car towards the late Ron Bell’s house not only do we need to put up with some bad humour but also on not one but two occasions our characters throw items out of seemingly rolled up windows!

Now once at the property the hilarity continues with a deputy, surely no older than 30 stating that the corpse was worse than anything he had seen in Vietnam….which had ended thirteen years previously. Hmm something doesn’t add up here but why let that get in the way of a good line. In fact in the extras, production manager Larry Ann Evans would even state that she informed Simón of some the script inadequacies but what the hell, this is entertainment.

Back to the film and the problems come thick and fast for Brady as both he and the town sanitation officer Don Palmer receive a call from a no doubt lonely grumpy old woman who is kicking off about the smell coming from a nearby sewer and on this our investigative team is formed and they embark upon a slimy mystery.

Never one to let a bit of time go by without any action by the end of the first act things get kicked up a notch as an elderly couple are blown up and Brady’s finger nearly chomped off by a giant slug, leading them to think that maybe just maybe there is something going on.

So, when you suspect that slugs might be going around town bumping people off but you aren’t quite sure what to do – the logical thing is to go and speak to the local English chemistry or biology (it’s never quite established who he is or what he does) nerd Foley; the brains behind the brawn provided by the health and sanitation officers. Foley knows his shit and sets about investigating exactly what they are up against and how they can defeat this underground evil.

If all this sounds like there might be too much plot creeping in for your liking don’t worry because in SLUGS you are only ever a few minutes away from action or hilarity as more brutal and slimy slayings occur and no one is safe, from the business man just trying to seal a deal to the horny naked teenagers also just trying to seal the deal. All the while Brady is trying to tell everyone that slugs are behind all of this but his explanations just fall on deaf ears as first the Sheriff retorts “Killer slugs for Christ’s sake. What will it be next? Demented Crickets?” and much later Frank Phillips, the head of the water department responds to Brady’s demands to declare a health emergency with a reply of “You ain’t got the authority to declare Happy Birthday!” Classic stuff.

Perhaps the main highlight of the film however occurs in between these two pieces of dialogue gold as a council representative is at lunch and just about to finally secure a major land development sale only for the dinner and deal to be interrupted by something that would not look out of place in fellow 1980s film STREET TRASH.

By now you probably understand that SLUGS does not really do subtlety or even pay much credence to build up as it hurtles towards a final climax where Brady and Palmer are forced to go rogue and take matters into their own hands by deciding to hunt down the slugs breeding ground and end this once and for all, no matter what the cost. Epic stuff indeed. 

SLUGS is a fast paced entertaining piece of trash with humorous dialogue and lashings of over the top action and gore. If you only watch one gastropod movie this year…make it this one and make it the Arrow release.

Version Reviewed:
I watched a copy of the Arrow Video 2016 blu ray release.  Featuring English only audio and subtitled for the hard of hearing the film itself looks and sounds great, unsurprisingly as the only blu ray release it is not difficult to see that this is the best presentation of the film out there.

Arrow haven’t stopped there however and have commissioned a bunch of new extras for this release. Starting with Here’s Slugs in Your Eye, an interview with Emilio Linder in which the actor tells about his enjoyment of working with director Simón and the relaxed atmosphere he cultivates on his sets. Later he tells an endearing story about his famous restaurant scene, but rather than discussing his definitive moment in the film, rather he indulges us with a tale of his love for actress Silvana Mangano, who he had the pleasure of meeting as she took a surprising cameo role for the restaurant sequence.

The disc also gives us They Slime, They Ooze, They Kill in which special Fx artist Carlo De Marchis talks about his work on the set, what worked the best and the obstacles which he faced. Unsurprisingly he also discusses the difficulty in directing and working with slugs – not the easiest as we can all imagine. Once again the interviewee only has positive words about the director even going as far as stating that “Piquer was as good as Spielberg”, strong words.

Further interviews include Invasion USA where the very thrifty but practical art director Gonzalo Gonzalo gives us some fascinating insights into the films production and is a joy to learn more from. Finally we have The Lyons Den in which production manager Larry Ann Evans takes us around the town of Lyons where the American exteriors (and some interiors) where shot. Despite bizarrely referring to Hutson’s original novel as an American book this feature is a fantastic tour of the locations used and the story behind them. Evan’s enthusiasm for the film is infectious and it doesn’t take long to be sucked into, and dare I say learning from, this informative little segment.

Furthermore we are also treated a trailer and a couple of audio commentary options, the first with writer and filmmaker Chris Alexander and the second with the original novel writer Shaun Hutson. Hutson’s commentary is fantastic as he speaks about his writing process, his influences not to mention the many scenes in the film that are not even in his novel let alone changed. Hutson’s self-deprecating but humorous comments really make this a commentary worth listening to on subsequent watches.

THE THIRD DAY (2018) BY FRANCESCO LONGO

Reviews

Director: Francesco Longo
Writer: Francesco Longo
Year: 2018
Starring: Roberto Ramon

Synopsis:
A man return to his home. Here, he will be faced with a dark truth, the world has been struck by a terrible plague.

Review:
With immediate effect a powerful, deep sound emanates from the speakers demanding your attention. This use of audio although somewhat generic, nonetheless elicits the desired response from the viewer and the short film, THE THIRD DAY, comes to life with a man bursting into his flat before frantically searching for some unknown item.

A sudden realisation or perhaps resignation comes over him as his erratic movement shifts from the external to the internal and starts to aggressively scratch his body. It is at this point that THE THIRD DAY gives us the old newsreader exposition cliche, filling us in regarding the backstory which here involves the standard tale of an infectious disease. Something our man is clearly showing the symptoms of.

Due to this and the brief length of the short – coming in at just under four-and-a-half minutes, THE THIRD DAY feels more like a strong pre-title sequence for a film in the vein of 28 DAYS LATER or the DAWN OF THE DEAD remake rather than a complete self contained piece. However based on the evidence of this and the directors previous work NYCTOPHOBIA I do hope that Francesco Longo gets the opportunity (not to mention budget) to expand this narrative into a longer piece of work.

DOLCEZZA EXTREMA (2015) BY ALBERTO GENOVESE

Reviews

AKA: Sick Sock Monsters from Outer Space
Director: Alberto Genovese
Writer: Massimo Vavassori
Starring: Alessandro Bianchi, Giovanni De Giorgi, Marco Antonio Andolfi, Paola Masciadri, Massimo Muntoni, Alberto Pagnotta

Synopsis:
In an unspecified year in the future, the Captain Pixws and his space pirate crew are forced to deliver tanning showers to every corner of the universe. Dolcezza Extrema starship will live an extraordinary adventure.

Review:
I feel that this review is almost pointless as after reading that synopsis the majority of film fans will have already decided if this film is for them or not. Clearly this film is absolutely bonkers, as a former drug taking hard rocker Captain Pixws (Giovanni De Giorgi) hurtles through space to sort out these bloody tanning showers and his crew of a plankton-loving (sock) fish, a desperate doctor who needs crew members to get ill in order to remain in a job and also nymphomaniac puppet who just wants satisfaction.

This plot is intentionally bizarre and the film revels in its own insanity proving at times hilarious while potentially borderline satirical of today’s body worship culture. Oh did I not mention that as well as tanning showers the beings in this film have to work out and achieve good bodies in order to stay warm enough to live. Yep, you read that right. So is this a take on today’s body worship culture or just a tale of ridiculous absurdity?

Away from the unique plot the fact that the film is filled with relatively cheap yet effective CGI (it was shot in front of a green screen) and some pretty nifty sock puppets, of which credit has to be given to the crew for the majority for, which rather than being just a quirky gimmick actually turn out to be a rather inventive bit of fun.

Additionally the music, courtesy of Antony Coia deserves special mention which on the whole was nicely done, varied and slightly bonkers; perfectly suiting the tone of the movie. One downside however is that even at just 80 minutes DOLCEZZA EXTREMA does unfortunately lag in some places and disappears into its own vortex of absurdity at others and so could benefit from a little bit more editing to tighten it up and add to the punchiness as witnessed in the trailer. Talking of punchiness the humour was a little hit and miss for me and I believe it will be for a number of viewers also but thankfully it is not jarring or too far off in terms of intention and so does not negate the overall experience of watching the film.

Born outoof a love for film and creativity this is a film which can be best described as a charming oddity, one that unsurprisingly had been picked up by Troma and distributed under the title SICK SOCK MONSTERS FROM OUTER SPACE, and it is either a piece of satirical genius or simply the writer Massimo Vavassori and director Alberto Genovese having fun and letting us join in with the laughs…I would recommend you have a drink beforehand and just go with the flow.

So if you are looking for a sexualised, surreal sci-fi film with puppets then DOLCEZZA EXTREMA is the film for you. If not, well I doubt you even made it this far in the review.

As well as Troma the film is distributed in Italy (and so should be reasonably accessible for all Europeans) on DVD and Blu-ray and if you are lucky you will be able to pick up a copy with a sock puppet! Makes sense and is certainly better than just a cardboard slip (which you may also get with certain editions).

THE WIFE KILLER (1976) BY DACOSTA CARAYAN

Reviews

Alternative Titles: The Rape Killer; Death Kiss; Vai Killer!; Mata Killer…mata; Crime in Cavouri; Eglima sto Kavouri
Director: Dacosta Carayan aka Kostas Karagiannis
Writer: Thanos Leivaditis
Year: 1976
Starring: Lakis Komninos aka Larry Daniels, Dorothy Moore, Vagelis Seilinos, Leslie Bowman

Synopsis:
Penniless playboy Captain Jim is in hock to his rich older wife, Helen. She has even bought him the fancy yacht that now bears his name. But Jim does not want to be Helen’s toy boy anymore. He wants to marry his lover, Laura. Jim pays a psychopathic killer of women to murder his wife so that he will inherit her millions. But the psycho killer has his own plans. Suspecting Jim will double cross him, he engineers a complex scheme that will give him the upper hand.

[Taken from the 2015 Mondo Macabro release]

Review:
By the time of this films release the giallo genre had built up momentum which arguably culminated in 1975 with its defining moment – Dario Argento’s DEEP RED – the effect being that subsequent films would begin to enter more exploitative territory in order to maintain the audiences interest and offer something different.

Marking director Dacosta Carayan’s second foray into thriller territory, with TANGO OF PERVERSION coming a few years earlier, he clearly learnt a few tricks to help ease the production (and post-production) process and you might very well notice a number of dialog scenes being shot from beside or behind the actors, thereby reducing the need for accurate lip synching. Not that that would have been a consideration had this been an Italian production.

But what of the film itself?

Well on their DVD release Mondo Macabro state that this is “A brutal thriller in the style of the Italian “giallo”…” and that is not far from the truth as this Greek production is clearly influenced by and should be evaluated as being in the filone of the genre. But THE WIFE KILLER displays a some particular influences both on and off screen. It takes inspiration from true events, from Alfred Hitchcock – most notably DIAL M FOR MURDER and also from Dario Argento’s long-time friend and collaborator Luigi Cozzi’s 1975 thriller THE KILLER MUST KILL AGAIN. A film with which it shares several similarities but considering the close proximity of the release dates between Luigi Cozzi’s film and THE WIFE KILLER we cannot say for sure if this was an actual influence or just a coincidence. Although we can clearly argue that several scenes are reminiscent of Sergio Martino’s 1973 giallo TORSO which was clearly an influence, particularly for the initial sequence set in the wooded area where lovers are spied on and attacked.

On the subject of TORSO and the KILLER MUST KILL AGAIN, both of these films are brought to mind with the opening of THE WIFE KILLER while the quick reveal of a sex maniac is bold move that works predominately thanks to the characters utilised in the film; including the adulterous Captain Jim and the slightly off Doctor. Hell, soon we even begin to suspect the beleaguered wife may or may not be involved. Nothing is beyond the realm of possibility in a film where double crossing and deceit is as natural as breathing.

Meanwhile fifty minutes in, the film begins to toy with the idea of introducing the more familiar amateur sleuth plot arc as one of the characters makes a startling discovery and although this is not fully explored on screen it does help to drive the overall story forwards while displaying a surprisingly restrained and mature writing approach that allows the film to remain focused and tight. This is still an exploitative film however and makes sure that we have plenty of female flesh to savour, several rape scenes to abhor (which would lead to an alternative US title of THE RAPE KILLER) and a few bouts of violence which is predominantly on women lending the film a slightly nasty undertone. But crucially and thankfully this aspect never overpowers the mystery or the film itself.

Of special mention is the score by Yannis Spanos which flits between jazz, rock and traditional Greek music – sometimes combining them all to great effect and for me is one of the stand out soundtracks of the genre as it perfectly complements rather than detracts from the scenes- hopefully someone puts this soundtrack out there.

It is a compliment to say that THE WIFE KILLER feels and plays out like the Italian films it was meant to emulate and this is true across all aspects. From the double crossing plot, the aforementioned soundtrack and the sex maniac angle all the way to the more brutal and sadistic action which was becoming more prevalent in the genre as a whole at the time.  The competent inclusion of these elements help us to place the film within the filone of the giallo as previously stated but it is the quality of the film itself that helps it to stand out as a strong and entertaining film even today. Greece may not have produced much genuinely good genre fare of note during this period but they can be proud of this film and I recommend fans of giallo to check out this sordid little gem.

Version Reviewed:

I reviewed the 2015 Mondo Macabro release which features a brand new transfer from the negative and looks fantastic both the format (DVD) and the age of the film. Mondo Macabro list this as the first official DVD release of the film and present it complete (including scenes with subtitling where no English dubbed version exists) and uncensored and the film does not hold back in this respect.

THE WIFE KILLER is highly recommended for all fans of cult cinema and aside from the excellent film Mondo Macabro have put together a brilliant package which includes information on the original influence of the film, detailed text about the film itself and the cast and crew, alternative English credits as well as a couple of US trailers under the title THE RAPE KILLER and its VHS release title DEATH KISS providing an interesting insight as to how the film was marketed to that audience.

However it is the documentary SUNSHINE AND SHADOWS in which critic/musician Akis Kapranos takes a look at the film and cult genre scenes in Greece. This documentary is extremely insightful particularly for those of us who do not know much about the Greek cinematic movement or phases and Mondo must be commended for its inclusion on this and the TANGO OF PERVERSION DVD.

Overall this is an excellent package and a mandatory purchase for those interested in European mystery / thriller cult cinema.

The Wife Killer DVD cover

MCBETTER (2018) BY MATTIA DE PASCALI

Reviews

Director: Mattia De Pascali
Writer: Mattia De Pascali
Year: 2018
Starring: Andrea Canaiello, Nik Manzi, Donatella Reverchon, Oscar Stajano, Sereno Toma

Synopsis:
A modern-day tragedy loosely based on Macbeth where the main character wants to conquer a fast-food restaurant chain instead of the Kingdom of Scotland. 

Review:
The synopsis of the film clearly states that this is a contemporary take of a Shakespearean classic and one would further assume, indeed I did, that this would be framed around a contemporary fast food joint, resulting perhaps in something like the American films WAITING (2005) crossed with THE FOUNDER (2016).

However MCBETTER plays more like a dynastic family struggle; a struggle for power and wealth with events unfolding within the mansion of a wealthy business man, Joe McBetter. The stakes though are for much more than just the future of the fast-food empire. De Pascali chooses to open the film with a televised mystic, a modern day witch if you will, providing encouragement to the portly figure of Malcom (Andrea Cananiello), a man who looks like a cross between Ron Jeremy and Joe Spinelli, and she tells our visually unlikely hero that his doubts are nothing and that he is the master of his own destiny. It is up to him to seize it.

Soon we learn that this is not strictly true as it is his girlfriend, Melanie (Serena Toma), who is really calling the shots. And as our power duo set off on a couples trip to her family home we start to grasp the extent of their duplicitous plans in which Melanie’s estranged father, the eponymous McBetter, is the key.

Much like Macbeth we are taken on a tale in which there are plans to usurp a king, to take and create a dynasty and the dangers of ambition but there is so much more in play here. From the quirky off-beat business idea of Malcom to the familial struggles of Melanie, MCBETTER works its black comedy into what at its heart is a much darker story…and it is all the better for it.

Throw in a doddering old housemaid, a young vivacious step-mother and her son, aptly named Little Joe, and you also have the recipe for a dysfunctional family drama in which talking solves nothing forcing our scheming duo into more drastic action. But they aren’t the only ones who are willing to go to such lengths.

By keeping the tone relatively consistent through his script Mattia De Pascali gives himself the leeway to experiment with visual styles (some of the lighting is positively Mario Bava or Dario Argento-esque) and tones as required by whichever strand of the story the narrative is following. While at just over one hour ten minutes long the film is perfect length, not once overstaying its welcome.

There are plenty of influences competing inside of MCBETTER but thankfully none of them overpower or unbalance the final project and as debuts go Mattia De Pascali has made a darkly comic tale which takes the themes of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and updates it with some Wes Anderson (RUSHMORE; THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS; ISLE OF DOGS) sensibilities and Italian style. 

Thanks to decent performances, strong direction and varied cinematography MCBETTER is an accomplished debut that is worthy of your time, but this is hardly surprising considering it features a supporting crew that includes David Bracci, Lucio Massa and Giulio Ciancamerla – all names who are growing in stature in the independent Italian scene.

Despite all of this I do worry that MCBETTER will be resigned to playing only a few festivals outside of its home country as has happened with many independent Italian films before BUT if it can get exposure I know it will find a fanbase, if in all likelihood only a small one.

However if you like quirky dark comedies, fancy taking a risk (check out the trailer below) and don’t mind ordering from (mainland) Europe then you will be able to pick up the film on DVD and Blu-ray in November as it gains a release from Home Movies.

Follow the film on Facebook.

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BAGHEAD (2017) BY ALBERTO CORREDOR

Reviews

Year: 2017
Director: Alberto Corredor
Writer: Lorcan Reilly
Starring:  Oliver Walker, Natalie Oliver, Julian Seager, Pat Boothman

Synopsis:
BAGHEAD is a ghost story. Kevin is haunted by grief and has questions that only the recently deceased can answer. His search takes him to the most unremarkable of locations, a grotty storage room at the back of a rundown pub. However, what he finds there is anything but unremarkable. He is introduced to Baghead, a shape-shifting witch who can channel the dead in a most unusual manner and maybe provide Kevin with the answers he seeks.

Review:
Not to be confused with the 2008 American feature from the excellent Duplass brothers, the short film BAGHEAD comes from the mind of British writer Lorcan Reilly and Spanish director Alberto Corredor.

Opening with despair and punishment, you would be forgiven for initially believing BAGHEAD to be a slasher or revenge movie. With the post-title sequence doing little to dispel that second option, even calling to mind, if only loosely Stan Winston’s PUMPKINHEAD.

In only fifteen captivating minutes writer Lorcan Reilly manages to convey a full narrative complete with past and present but perhaps crucially without any one aspect feeling rushed or under thought. It is clear to see why the script for BAGHEAD went on to win production funds from ShortTV. Money that was very well spent.

Due to the length of the short film and the story contained within it I won’t discuss or detail the plot, but I do urge you to check out this darkly comic and twisted tale of loss, love and vengeance.

The majority of short films that I see are portfolio pieces as writers and directors develop their skills for wider audiences and bigger (feature) opportunities and if taken in that spirit then BAGHEAD is  an accomplished piece in every aspect.

Credit needs to go to both the cast for their strong performances and the crew for strong and well composed shots, editing and sound. However BAGHEAD is more than that and more than the sum of its (considerable) parts and in its own right stands up as a terrific story and watch. With potential to become a feature length I am looking forward to seeing what comes next from both Lorcan Reilly and Alberto Corredor…hopefully an extension of this impressive short.

The film is currently doing the rounds on the festival circuit, and in fact played at the most recent FrightFest in London,  and as of September 2018 it was confirmed for the following upcoming festivals:

Sitges Film Festival; Manhattan Short Film Festival; San Diego Film Festival; Freakshow Horror Film Festival; Mollins Film Festival; Sacramento Horror Fest.

I presume if you are going to one of these then you will already know the date…and now you will know of BAGHEAD so make sure you check it out.

View the trailer here.

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