The Case of the Bloody Iris comes to UK Blu

blog

Now I don’t normally write stuff based on press releases I receive, from my previous site Cosi Perversa I found this to be a pointless exercise in the main, but as I am such a big fan of both the label and the film I thought I would make an exception. Especially since one member of the cast, and I doubt it is who you expect, has helped inspire me with a forthcoming article.

So without much further ado (and it is very obvious from the title) coming from the terrific UK label ‘Shameless Films’, and for the first time on UK Blu-Ray is Giuliano Carnimeo’s (RATMAN) 1972 giallo THE CASE OF THE BLOODY IRISa giallo featuring the iconic duo and giallo royalty of Edwige Fenech and George Hilton.

After two beautiful women are murdered in an apartment block, Jennifer (Edwige Fenech) and Marilyn (Paola Quattrini) move into the flat of one of the slaughtered girls. But before long, the unknown predatory pervert soon turns his salacious attentions to the gorgeous Jennifer. The list of suspects of who this maniac could be grows ever longer as we start to consider a woman and her deformed son, a crazy lesbian and even Jennifer’s own lover!

All the while throughout the film we are serenaded with Bruno Nicolai’s enrapturing (and extremely memorable) score and terrific cinematography from Stelvio Massi, this long-sought-after 70s sleaze gem will be available on Shameless Blu-ray in a 2k restored special edition for the first time ever in the UK!

With Bonus Features including a new candid chat with the always handsome George Hilton, as well as one with the bubbly Paola Quattini, I certainly do believe that it is time to upgrade from the old ‘Beyond Terror’ DVD release or even discover this neat little giallo for the first time. I even suspect that your favourite character will the quirky and hilarious Police Inspector.

One watch of the trailer should be enough to make you purchase this essential film.

THE CASE OF THE BLOODY IRIS is released on Blu-ray (and also DVD) from Shameless on 19th November and will be available for pre-order and order from all the usual places and also direct from Shameless themselves here.

[Also of interest, the original story by Italian screenwriting legend Ernesto Gastaldi has also been novelised by Michael R Hudson and is available in both paperback and digital edition. This version has several differences to that of the filmed version.]

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Trailer below;

TORSO (1973) BY SERGIO MARTINO

Reviews

Alternative Titles: I corpi presentano tracce di violenza carnale; Carnal Violence; Torso – Violencia carnal; The Bodies Presented Traces of Carnal Violence
Director: Sergio Martino
Writers: Ernesto Gastaldi, Sergio Martino
Year: 1973
Starring: Suzy Kendall, Tina Aumont, Luc Merenda, John Richardson

Synopsis:
Students at a Perugia summer school are being killed with the only clue being a red and black scarf. In order to get away from an obsessed, spurned suitor, American Jane and her friends decide to travel to an isolated villa in the country, only for the spate of killings to follow them.

Review:
Beautiful women and ugly violence combine in this psycho-sexual thriller from Sergio Martino. Wasting no time in getting to the point (or arguably also the clichés) TORSO immediately introduces us to the power, or rather temptation of the flesh, placing it at the heart of this violent mystery. As a camera shoots pornographic images, white flesh becomes entangled inside a black, featureless room and a child’s doll is shown to us, clearly hinting at a future significance and perhaps perversion.

This intriguing beginning soon gives way to a summer school in the beautiful Italian city of Padua and after a quick introduction to our key group of characters we jump to yet more sex although this time it is rudely interrupted by a menacing POV shot, a technique by  now firmly established in the genre. It is here that first exemplifies one of the values that Sergio Martino and Ernesto Gastaldi bring to the genre as what could be an exploitative, simple yet mediocre sequence is imbued with genuine moments of tension before giving way to moments of light relief, for the viewer at least, as post-murder, the assigned Detective Martino questions a local peasant who was in the area.

As a result of these slayings the local police make a plea to the art students providing them with one key piece of identifying evidence and one of our group, Dani (Tina Aumont) just knows that she recognises it from somewhere…but where, although she seems desperate to pin the blame on her creepy and infatuated classmate Stefano.

In a bid to get away from it all, her voyeuristic Uncle sends her and her friends off to his isolated rural villa as he needs to leave the country on business. Needless to say the group of girls arrive in the village and cause quite a stir with the local men including with the local part-time Val Kilmer look-a-like and full-time village idiot, but they aren’t the only ones with their eyes fixed on the group as death follows them too.

Culminating in a tense and engrossing final act, including the inversion of the conventional (killer) POV scene where in this case we witness our protagonist spying on the unaware killer, the film will have you screaming for the final girl to not try and escape and these scenes really are a credit to the terrific pacing which never once loses the viewers attention in its orgy of suspicion, violence and sex.

This is thanks to the skill and experience of Ernesto Gastaldi and Sergio Martino that throughout the films tight 90-minute runtime that it manages to spend enough time on the supporting cast and wider narrative allowing for not only the foundations of the overriding mystery to be set but also for the successful framing of the narrative allowing the possibility of a few potential killers to remain instead of relying on a cheap trick at the end.

As a result we have a decent story that manages to divulge information and implicate with every turn and although a little heavy handed at times on some beats (the fall down the stairs for example) this is at least done out of necessity in order to drive the narrative forwards. Credit also has to go to the duo for the subtle injection of humour at work, primarily provided by the background characters, which helps provide a tonal break for the viewer allowing the films more convoluted aspects to remain fresh and engaging.

Featuring almost as many suspects as breasts and a rampant killer this top tier giallo will undoubtedly entertain fans of the genre. Despite having a motive based upon a slightly flimsy origin, albeit one that perfectly conformed to the tropes of the genre at the time, TORSO works because it manages to strike that perfect balance between exploitative sleaze, violence and mystery.

If you are yet to watch this film get online or to your local store and pick up a copy. You won’t be disappointed and in all likelihood will love this film to bits. If the dodgy cover is putting you off, don’t worry it has a reversible sleeve which you will most certainly use.

Finally I would like to give regular Sergio Martino cinematographer Giancarlo Ferrando (ALL THE COLOURS OF THE DARK; YOUR VICE IS A LOCKED ROOM…;THE VIOLENT PROFESSIONALS; the list goes on but you get the picture, and the pun I hope) credit for his work on this film in which he creates many iconic moments while maintaining that level of consistency and visual coherence that to me, helps define a Sergio Martino film.

Version Reviewed:

The 2017 blu ray release from Shameless Films is as one would expect, superior to the previous DVD versions. In direct comparison to the 2007 Shameless DVD it is not only a nicer looking HD version but includes English language scene inserts, which although not necessarily vital do add an extra level of completion or rather variety .

Shameless have also answered my gripes with the previous DVD release, in so much as they have now included an ‘Italian version’ with revised English subtitles (although the inserted scenes remain in Italian with English subtitles as the English language track was never recorded for these) and this time they have actually included a genuine ‘extra’ feature away from the usual company portfolio showreels (but don’t worry a couple of trailers for the most recent blu’s is included here) – in the form of a new, 22 minutes interview with director Sergio Martino.

In this interesting and somewhat (although minor) revealing interview the director briefly discusses the influences of the character traits held by the killer as well as how the production came about. Sergio Martino goes on to speak rather candidly, and sadly fleetingly, about a few of the casting choices and also some elements of the film that he is now not so keen on…and a few sections that he is, not to mention the origins of the now iconic white mask.

THE CYNIC, THE RAT AND THE FIST (1977) BY UMBERTO LENZI

Reviews

Alternative Titles: Il cincio, l’infame, il violento; O Cínico, O Infame, O Violento; Le cynique, l’infâme, le violent; Die Gewalt bin ich
Director: Umberto Lenzi
Writer: Ernesto Gastaldi, Dardano Sacchetti, Umberto Lenzi
Year: 1977
Starring: Maurizio Merli, John Saxon, Tomas Milian, Renzo Palmer

Synopsis:
Luigi ‘Chinaman’ Maietto bursts free from the big house and sets in motion his revenge on the man who put him there, the legendary Inspector Leonardo Tanzi. When an assassination attempt leaves Chinaman believing the heroic officer dead, Tanzi uses his new found anonymity to bring down the numerous crime organisations that are helping ruin his beloved city.

Review:
THE CYNIC, THE RAT AND THE FIST represents the return of Inspector Tanzi as moustachioed blonde Maurizio Merli reprises his role as the vigilante Inspector from ROME ARMED TO THE TEETH (aka ROMA A MANO ARMATA; THE TOUGH ONES, ASSAULT WITH A DEADLY WEAPON and BRUTAL JUSTICE in the USA).

No doubt commercially THE CYNIC, THE RAT AND THE FIST with so named as a riff off of Sergio Leone’s THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY and it wastes no time in getting started as within ten seconds we witness a mugging. This undoubtably sets the tone for this ramped up sequel before it cuts into the by now clichéd shots of cars cruising the city as a flurry of criminal activities take place, and police cars speed around including past the iconic Milanese duomo instantly placing this film away from its predecessor.

After the opening credits we meet Tanzi, now a murder mystery novel consultant who discovers as he returns home from his surely unfulfilling job that someone has left an obituary note for marking his date of death as that very day. A bad omen for things to come. Thankfully he still possesses a gun so we know at least he will be safe…although I am certain his hands are registered weapons.

Jump to a shot of a police teleprompter and we learn of a criminal named ‘The Chinese’ who has just broken out of jail while the police inspector Astalli (played by genre regular Renzo Palmer – DANGER DIABOLIK; STREET LAW; VAI GORILLA; THE BIG RACKET and also alongside Merli in WHITE FANG TO THE RESCUE) calls in Tanzi to warn him that this criminal, who Tanzi apparently helped put away, might be looking for some payback. A hunch that we know is justified and ends up with our Inspector being dispatched…or so it seems allowing the action and characters to be transported back to Rome, even if most of them are meant to be elsewhere. With the basic plot now outlined we are free to enjoy the rest of the film and meet the rest of our cast.

With that we can say hello to our friend Tomas Milian, who plays The Chinese aka China, and he is quickly joined on screen by John Saxon, playing the American-Italian gangster Di Maggio. After a bit of fun small talk they get down to talking business…illegal business.

All of this and more has happened in just twenty minutes by  which time we have met our three main characters, how they relate to each other and witnessed just why Saxon is the top Mafioso in the city. All of this means a battle for justice, money and ultimately for vengeance is on the cards.

Tanzi’s struggle sees him once again pitted up against several hoodlums as the plot develops and ends up using almost anything available to him in his bid to bring criminal to justice including faulty wiring, stage lights, a camera which leads to a witty one-liner or even a sound board to burn a guy’s face, particularly brutal even for this film although the acid attack runs it close. As you can probably surmise there is a lot of action in this film and it is quite quickly paced with the result on our ex-Inspector becoming more and more desperate when faced against overwhelming odds, which is evidenced by the time he car jacks an innocent woman in a bid to get away from some crooks.

For all the desperation of the character however quite often Merli is in pure 70s playboy mode, the model of masculinity throughout the film even when he is hilariously traversing a corridor of laser beams, bordering on the comical as the film takes on almost a 60s spy thriller vibe thanks to the look of the ‘beams’ aka red string and the use of lighting.

On the contrary, Milian’s character China is a lot more relaxed and in control however some might argue the actor is disinterested but I would disagree although the character is a lot less repugnant than Il Gobbo in ROME ARMED TO THE TEETH and a little less unhinged which no doubt lends itself to this opposing view. Sure Milian’s performance is perhaps not as good as in the earlier film, who knows if the frustration of working with Merli boiled over resulting in the genuine bitterness on screen which was absent here but his performance as ‘The Chinaman’ is more than competent here while Saxon is his usual reliable self but it is quite clear that he only has a supporting role here.

Behind the camera things are just as good and it is apparent that even in the short time from the first Tanzi film, Gastaldi & Lenzi have increased their understanding of the genre’s constructs, its requirements and most importantly its audience. While the sporadic use of POV help ramp up the tension when necessary and shows how Lenzi has utilised all the tricks of the trade learned through his years of gialli and mystery.

Witty, violent and pure fun THE CYNIC, THE RAT AND THE FIST is a film free from all societal and institutional story restrictions and this is its greatest asset as it allows Tanzi to go straight up against China and by extension Di Maggio with the usual building vinaigrettes giving way to a longer over riding narrative broken up by almost inconsequential crime peppered about to keep the momentum going.  The benefit is the scriptwriters ably manage to combine narrative context with action seamlessly allowing for an action packed, fast paced film but also this time with a compelling story arc that elevates the film to the upper echelons of the genre.

However for those of you who have read Curti’s fantastic book, Italian Crime Filmography, 1968-1980 will find an opposing opinion to my own and so depending on your own personal approach to the genre you may wish to delve a little further into investigating this film.

Where I do agree with Curti however is in the use of the females, as often with Eurocrime films they are merely there as instruments for either the story or setting up an action set piece and here it is no different and although to judge a film by modern day sensibilities is always a dangerous thing to do it is clear who this film was aimed at and what the prevailing attitude was at the time.

Nevertheless it is an enjoyable straight forward film and if you want a bit more humour I recommend the English dub which mocks Merli’s stereotypically un-Italian blonde hair and blue eyes but whatever your audio preference grab a beer and a copy of the 88 Films version for a guaranteed fun night in.

Version Reviewed:
I watched the 2017 blu ray release from 88 Films. It’s a high-definition transfer from the original camera negative and I doubt the film has ever looked this good. Audio wise it has a restored English soundtrack, a restored Italian soundtrack and obviously English subtitles.

What’s more 88 Films have put in the effort and commissioned some extras just for this release, well perhaps not technically as some of it appears to be cut from the same source as the extra’s on the SYNDICATE SADISTS release but I’ll get to that in a minute.

The extras include eurocrime expert Mike Malloy talking about the film for just over ten minutes in an informative and humorous segment where Malloy tells of about the story happening behind the camera as well as in front of it. I’m happy to say Malloy takes to the camera like Merli to a backhanded slap and I certainly hope 88 Films use him some more…and unsurprisingly he does feature on the SYNDICATE SADISTS release as well.

Further extras include ‘Armed to the teeth again: An interview with Umberto Lenzi’ which contains a couple of revelations (such as the motivation of Milian during filming of ALMOST HUMAN) and tales covering both his own films and the animosity between Merli and Milian and the problems this caused. Although Lenzi does appear to misremember a few bits of his films this is forgivable considering the period of time that has passed and the great volume of work he has been involved with. Furthermore it is clear that this is part of a longer interview with segments taken for other releases.  In addition to this we also get ‘The cynic, the rat and the sadist: An interview with Tomas Milian’ where the actor seems to talk more about SYNDICATE SADISTS and therefore really should be on that release instead of this one. Regardless Milian is an interesting fellow to talk to and his discussion about his choice of dubbing artist, Ferruccio Amendola if you are interested, is an interesting insight into an area not often covered while he also discusses this films sequel, ROME ARMED TO THE TEETH, a release I am hoping 88 Films acquire soon.