VAMP STALKER (2017) BY EROS BOSI

Reviews

Director: Erosi Bosi
Writer: Eros Bosi
Year: 2017
Starring: Eros Bosi, Serena Meloni, Giovanni Tasca, Maurizio Bolli

VAMP STALKER is the latest short film from upcoming Italian writer-director Eros Bosi and continues in the same vein as his previous horror-comedy EVIL SELFIE.

Opening with a young woman, Serena Meloni, going to watch a horror film at a local cinema, it doesn’t take long after sitting down for her to notice a pale-faced guy, played by writer/director Eros Bosi, beginning to watch her rather than the film. Turning to face her admirer she notices not his looks but his sharp fangs and that is enough to cause her to quickly leave.

Panicked she soon realises that she did not leave alone as our young Dracula gives chase but every time it looks as if he is about to catch his prey she manages to avoid his grasp, building the tension until a delightful twist turns what could have been a linear two-dimensional horror into a comedy in the same vein as the the terrific WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS.

This tonal shift and payoff works well thanks to the build-up being played straight, and in doing so allowing the resulting vampiric love triangle to act as a catalyst for the remaining hilarious action. On the subject of comedy this is a genre that often struggles to cross cultural borders but here the comedic dialogue comes across as intentioned thanks to being based in horror lore as opposed to some geographical understanding.

Furthermore this short film also utilises much physical comedy which is borderline splatterstick thanks to action such as an offending finger getting bitten off, an eye getting gouged out and, well, I don’t want to say what is done with a snooker ball. Although where VAMP STALKER does fall down is in regards to the brief physical confrontations which come across as too restrained and fake with the ultimate result being that it takes the viewer out of the whole experience. The humorous violence being unrealistic is one thing, that is all part of the low budget package that we know and love but sadly that does not extend to hand-to-hand combat.

This however is only a minor and brief issue and all is quickly forgotten thanks to the films charm, which is no doubt enhanced thanks to the love of the genre from Eros Bosi, who goes as far as to reference contemporary Italian horrors E.N.D by Domiziano Cristopharo (via a poster) and NON NUOTATE IN QUEL FIUME by Roberto Albanesi (playing in the cinema) within the brief ten minute run time.

Employing a nice level of genre self-awareness and plenty of humour, for what VAMP STALKER lacks in budget it more than makes up for in fun, similar to those VHS amateur pioneers back in the early eighties. The horror-comedy genre is a notoriously hard one to get right and it would be interesting to see if the young writer/director can make that step up when the time comes to make his first feature film as he manages to get the balance spot on here.

Version reviewed:
I watched an Italian language online screener of the film.

EVIL SELFIE (2016) BY EROS BOSI

Reviews

Alternative Titles: N/A
Director: Eros Bosi with support by Luca Alessandro
Writer: Eros Bosi
Year: 2016
Starring: Gene Gnocchi, Chiara Palombi, Eros Bosi, Diletta Vedovelli

Synopsis:
Isabella is a young girl who lives in a small town. Through a strange series of events, caused by a broken mirror, she meets Fabiano and Mara, mad like her for “selfies”. But all new encounters hide something, and sometimes a mobile phone can show the truth…

Review:
EVIL SELFIE is the debut short film for upcoming Italian rookie Eros Bosi who was mentored during this process by the more experienced Luca Alessandro (E.N.D THE MOVIE; THE PYRAMID). It begins with the lovely Isabella (Chiara Palombi) doing what many of her peers do constantly, that’s right take a selfie. However when the mirror in front of her breaks she knows she is due some bad luck. Isabella’s a smart cookie however and looks up ways to break this curse or so she thought.

Seven days later (almost like THE RING here) while out finishing the steps to ensure no misfortune befalls her she collapses and dies. Her father obviously worried when she doesn’t return home begins to search for her only to find a bloody piece of mirror and visions of his dead daughter. This opening act certainly has a bit of the J-Horror genre about it and is played pretty straight but once established it allows Alessandro and Bosi  to develop the story into new territory and inject a sly sense of humour to the proceedings.

A little while later, an amorous couple (Bosi appearing in front of the camera alongside Diletta Vedovelli – both of whom put in good performances) pull into the field looking for a bit of alone time but before the guy is allowed to have his way his girlfriend insists on a selfie but her pictures end up  showing more than just our couple.

Although EVIL SELFIE is slightly lacking in the effective scares department it more than compensates for this through its humour and take on contemporary society with the concept almost (but certainly the trailer) channelling Carpenter’s THEY LIVE  but almost ironically despite the almost blind compulsion of using it the only thing that can save you is your phone…although then it might just be your girlfriend that kills you!

EVIL SELFIE is a fun watch thanks to a decent story that has the potential to be expanded into a much more serious piece of work or even go the other way into a parody of modern culture and even the J-Horror genre films (THE RING, SHUTTER etc.) which are not a million miles away.

Furthermore the entire crew do themselves justice with competent direction and strong editing underpinning some decent performances from a largely inexperienced cast. Eros Bosi is certainly one for horror fans to keep an eye on and if he continues to learn from the likes of Alessandro then we look forward to him appearing both behind and in front of another camera soon.

Finally of note the short film features Gene Gnocchi in a cameo role, and although not familiar to audiences outside of Italy, they may recognise him from roles in several TV series as well as a handful of feature films.

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ROME ARMED TO THE TEETH (1976) BY UMBERTO LENZI

Reviews

Alternative Titles: Roma A Mano Armato; The Tough Ones; Roma Armada; Roma a mano armada; Brigade special; Assault with a Deadly Weapon; Brutal Justice; Die Viper
Director: Umberto Lenzi
Writer: Dardano Sacchetti
Year: 1976
Starring: Maurizio Merli, Arthur Kennedy, Giampiero Albertini, Tomas Milian, Ivan Rassimov

Synopsis:
A tough, violent vigilante cop makes it his mission to bring to justice a machine-gun-carrying, hunchback killer by any means necessary.

Review:
The first of two Inspector Tanzi films (THE CYNIC, THE RAT AND THE FIST would follow the subsequent year with stars Maurizio Merli and Tomas Milian rekindling their bromance), ROME ARMED TO THE TEETH kicks off in traditional genre style – with an in-car camera sequence allowing us to cruise the streets and case the local banks while bobbing our heads to a nice little score courtesy of Franco Micalizzi.

We quickly meet our hero, Inspector Tanzi (Maurizio Merli) who is tipped off about a gambling den which he promptly raids with all the usual charm and violence of the archetypal Maurizio Merli character. Keep an eye out for the hapless guy who answers the door and is suddenly thrown to the floor by the entering Tanzi. Rather than being pissed off he picks himself up and casually strolls across to the bar for a J&B.

Annoyed that the bust didn’t yield any significant collars barring one known thug,  Tanzi doesn’t have to wait long before getting a second chance to dispense some justice. As lucky would have it while being sat in his car waiting, he witnesses a motorbike mugging by a couple of criminals. Determined not to let these crooks slip through his fingers he sets off in pursuit only to realise right before dishing out another ass kicking that they are just kids.

These action set pieces however are just a prelude to the adult violence that would follow, including a brutal robbery that personally affects Tanzi. This sequence not only provides the motivation for Tanzi to increase his efforts but also is used as a plot device by Dardano Sacchetti to highlight the impotence of the Italian justice system, thus working this genre trope in relatively early.

By now the Inspector has shown himself to be the stereotypical vigilante cop, one who sees the police methods he is duty bound to adhere to as actually being restrictive putting the whole force at a disadvantage when compared to ironically liberalised criminals they are up against.

Such is Tanzi’s disillusionment with the system that after a violent robbery occurs resulting in the death of a guard, when a colleague states that “we shouldn’t have let him go the other day” referring to an unrepentant and repeat criminal, a clearly irritated Tanzi replies “Don’t be silly. A cops been murdered but we went by the book that day. That’s what’s important.” Hmm as a viewer we doubt that he is being sincere.

In ROME ARMED TO THE TEETH director Umberto Lenzi and writer Dardano Sacchetti don’t just deliver the expected goods but have a knack for adding just that bit more to differentiate their films as interestingly for this type of movie, Tanzi has a permanent girlfriend, Anna (Maria Rosaria Omaggio – who went on to star with Tomas Milian in COP IN BLUE JEANS as well as NIGHTMARE CITY and BLOODY SIN), a youth offender psychologist who acts as the sympathetic voice of redemption and rehabilitation to his more hardline, uncompromising, black and white, dare we even say intolerant approach to justice. This differing ideology is in fact the cause of much friction between the two, further exacerbated by the plight of the aforementioned two juvenile offenders. Although immediately after the most extreme bout of these discussions the film presents his methods as paradoxically the safest solution for those setting out on a criminal path.

“I’m talking about two young boys dead by excess of humanity”

This could easily be a throwaway line in a film that appears to prioritise action over genuine social commentary. But through not only the idealistic sparring but also the seemingly minor conversations between Tanzi, the Chief and their peers, it appears that Dardano Sacchetti might actually have something to say about the methods of Italian justice of the time.

And bizarrely it is something that resonates with us today. Becoming particularly relevant in the context of the witnessed shifts in voter trends across Western and Central Europe as well as the arguments around the liberal elite, political correctness and the rise of the right – enabled by the impotence or perhaps over compassion of the left.

Almost ironically however Tanzi, through his police state brutality and repression of rights represents the defender of citizens’ freedom and safety. This is a theme that was prevalent in several high profile Italian films of the early seventies and clearly tapped into the feeling at the time, be it for or, in most cases against the status quo be it governmental or economical.

Back to the film and Tanzi’s partner Anna; through her no doubt justifiable arguments for reform and second chances she states that “prison makes them all delinquent”. A clear attempt to justify one sides argument that the contemporary methods were not suitable but rather trapping those caught into a self-perpetuating, dangerous cycle. 

Again parallels could be drawn to our modern times, especially in the UK where the effectiveness of reform is being investigated, albeit for economical rather than humanitarian reasons.

All of this happens in next to no time as Umberto Lenzi has covered all of this within the first seventeen minutes, and all before we even first meet Tomas Milian (it’s an even longer wait for you Ivan Rassimov fans) who plays Moretto. 

A seemingly pitiful hunchback on the periphery of the criminal underworld and unfairly framed by Tanzi in their first encounter. In fact Tanzi appears to go too far here and Moretto is driven to desperation in his bid for revenge. An act that has significant consequences for the Inspector, both personally and professionally. 

But what about Ivan Rassimov? He hasn’t been forgotten and finally makes an appearance halfway through the movie as an abusive boyfriend who is keeping his young girlfriend dependent on drugs. Unfortunately for him however the girl is the sister of Tanzi’s fallen colleague giving him a feeling of responsibility to set things right.

Now to keep momentum going there unfortunately isn’t room in the story for two key villains and as a result Ivan Rassimov is given a surprisingly small part for an actor of his standing but does excel in the limited time he has. 

This smaller than expected role is almost forced by the construction of the films in the genre. It also has the added effect of meaning that it takes a while for the Tomas Milian character Moretto to actually develop, but the wait is not only worth it but additionally helps to frame the character subsequent actions in a wider context.

Tomas Milian’s character gets pushed further and further and we begin to a transformation from Moretto the outcast to Il Gobbo, where his mental state and compassion soon begin to mimic his physical appearance, at least in regards to the attitudes of the time. 

And by the final act he has completed his transformation in the machine-gun welding madman that indiscriminately hurts anyone who stands in his way of self-gratification and money. 

A couple of the storylines that make up ROME ARMED TO THE TEETH eventually dovetail (with the others merely included for narrative momentum or potentially to flesh out the run time) leading to a final confrontation and bizarrely a motivational switch between our Inspector and his right hand man. Although once again Tanzi’s initial thoughts on justice are ultimately reinforced. 

It is a shame however that despite this, the actual end of the film is a little lackluster especially when compared to the rest of the films actions and it’s contemporaries.

While arguably Dardano Sacchetti tries to weave too many elements into the story, and despite being wrapped up I feel the film never had the resolution it was meant to, and is in fact rather forgettable compared to the previous action. 

Umberto Lenzi’s first film in the Tanzi series is less political or social in focus than many of its peers and while the Inspector suffers from the genre clichés of being frustrated by the impotence of the law, something explicitly stated via dialogue, I would argue that this focus is not a  key objective of the film which prefers to prioritise frequent bouts of action.

The film also works in a few moments of humour such as the chief of police suddenly remembering at midnight it’s his 22nd wedding anniversary and demanding a sergeant gets him a dozen red roses immediately or one of several wisecracks made by Tanzi or Moretto. This element does help to break up the film allowing the viewer to remain engaged.

Now it has been stated by other sources that Umberto Lenzi, and some of his films by extension, had fascist leanings and while the story does lean more to the centre-right suggesting anything more would be a gross overstatement especially when we consider that other characters provide a genuine balance to the issues both in their interactions and their own minds. And while Dardano Sacchetti would write the script it was from a collaborative story with Umberto Lenzi and so we have to allow the man some credit for this balance there, even if the authoritarian side always wins…but if it didn’t then we would be left with a poor excuse for an action film.

Combining strong camera work with terrific editing, which accentuates the action due to the choice of cut timings being spot on, it is a shame that the anti-climactic ending somewhat dampens the final thoughts of the film, but ROME ARMED TO THE TEETH is despite this, guaranteed to entertain fans of the genre both new and old.

My only other minor gripe would be with one sequence which appears a little more sadistic than the others and therefore a little out of place but it passes quickly and normal ass-kicking Maurizio Merli action is resumed.

If you do check this film out and it floats your boat make sure you also watch the sequel THE CYNIC, THE RAT AND THE FIST as well as the quite conceptually similar Betti films (VIOLENT ROME, VIOLENT NAPLES, A SPECIAL COP IN ACTION) which sometimes share actors, directors and in the terms of the last of the trilogy almost the same title.

On a side note Umberto Lenzi and Tomas Milian would almost reprise the character of the hunchback in the unrelated 1978 film ‘LA BANDA DEL GOBBO’ with ‘gobbo’ being the italian word for ‘hunchback’. And be on the look out for the US release under THE TOUGH ONES in which several establishing shots have been allegedly changed in order to port the action from Italy to the US.

Lucky or not so lucky Ros!

Articles and Interviews

Wait, you’re that guy from that movie, aren’t you?

Many may not know his name but almost every Italian genre fan will know his face. Having appeared in over 70 movies, although not always credited, the career of Luciano Rossi appears almost a paradox. 

Constantly in work but barely ever in truly memorable roles, Luciano Rossi would be seemingly invisible in the grand scheme of things, often reduced to a mere footnote, due to the frequency of being cast in a minor or extra role, usually as a glorified punch-bag.

However thankfully his contribution has been not only noted, but actually the sole purpose of the book A Violent Professional by Kier-La Janisse, and it is in this spirit of recognition that I wrote this brief piece on his more known genre work. And if you enjoy this piece (or even if you don’t) I would suggest picking up A Violent Professional, which marks an interesting read and discovery of the man’s roles. 

Luciano Rossi was born in Rome on the 28th November, 1934 and would begin adulthood working at an import/export business before deciding that acting would be the career for him. As a result he began visiting Cinecittà regularly looking for any work that he could find as an actor.

No doubt aided by his distinct and stereotypically un-Italian appearance his first, albeit uncredited, role was as a German soldier in the 1962 war drama ‘Dieci italiani per un Tedesco (Via Rasella)’ which literally translates as ten Italians for a German. 

For whatever reason it would be a further four years before he would return to the big screen  – this time appearing in the Franco Nero fronted DJANGO.  Although uncredited once again, this brief role saw him play a lackey to the town Major, and would set the tone for many of his future roles as viewers would witness him being violent towards a woman before being killed. Normally I might consider that bit of information a spoiler but as this is Luciano Rossi we are talking about these actions are almost a given. 

Several varied roles followed across a range of genres as Luciano Rossi, like many other Italians in the industry, forged a journeyman career but at least for him there was one constant – Django! In total he would go on to feature in seven Django films during the late sixties (including ‘Sentenza di morte’) as well as a handful of other westerns and crime flicks.

After a very active 1968/69 his career was on an upward trajectory, at least in terms of volume of work, but it would be another uncredited role in 1970 that would see him appear in perhaps the most successful film he would ever be involved in – Bernardo Bertolucci’s THE CONFORMIST. It is just a shame that his role is so brief that you might miss him even if you don’t blink.

However things would soon click for Rossi however with a role in Roberto Bianchi Montero’s 1972 giallo-esque thriller SO SWEET, SO DEAD which is also known by the catchy title THE SLASHER IS THE SEX MANIAC or if you manage to get hold of the US hardcore sex version, PENETRATION. Although I suspect that version had a very targeted audience for whom plot and mystery had little to do with the appeal.

Roberto Bianchi Montero’s film features an almost moralistic killer who targets adulterous women resulting in several denouncements for misogyny and it certainly does attempt to live up to the more salacious and presumed stereotype of the sleazy side of the genre, However due to the cast this film is still worth your time, but don’t go expecting a classic. 

In it Luciano Rossi plays a morgue attendant who likes to engage in, let’s say, extracurricular work activities but portrays the character more as pitiful than perverse – a distraction or a lead suspect, that is for you to find out.

In addition to this, Luciano Rossi would go on to feature in a small but notable role in Luciano Ercoli’s giallo DEATH WALKS ON HIGH HEELS, 1971. Playing Hallory, a very distinctive village local, he managed to briefly steal some of the attention away from our leads in a terrific and intriguing little robbery thriller-come-giallo.

Now whatever he did on set, he clearly did it well enough to feature in the directors second ‘Death walks…’ feature, released the following year. Although in truth it was probably harder to not be recast by Luciano Ercoli than it was to be cast as highlighted by the return of several actors. 

Only this time in DEATH WALKS AT MIDNIGHT he gained a bit more screen time with his memorable role as Hans, seeing him cast as a German once again while also maintaining his default comeuppance and ultimately taking a beating.

Crazy and hamming it up, Luciano Rossi not only looked fantastic in this film but also puts in arguably one of his best performances, even if he was had very little dialogue or variety to work with. 

Now death isn’t a good thing for most people but Luciano Rossi thrived off in a manner of speaker as he followed up these two films with appearances in Maurizio Pradeaux’s neat little giallo DEATH CARRIES A CANE, seeing the actor once again feature alongside Luciano Ercoli’s other half and muse Nieves Navarro aka Susan Scott. This film of ‘death’ was soon followed by DEATH SMILES ON A MURDERER by Joe D’Amato. In this he managed to secure a relatively awful lot of screen time as the hunchback Fritz in what Janisse would call “one of the most satisfying roles of Rossi’s career”.

By this point the Italian industry saw the giallo wane, at least in terms of its golden period, with this genre being overtaken in popularity by the rise in eurocrime and poliziotteschi. So it would be no surprise to see Luciano Rossi, along with many others in the Italian film industry which no doubt suffered from cronyism, make the move across. However this would not be it for him and the giallo as he would return later to the genre, if only loosely with 1974’s PROSTITUZIONE by Rino Di Silvestro – a curious hybrid of giallo and social sleaze.

However back on cinematic trend, Luciano Rossi went on to appear in THE VIOLENT PROFESSIONALS (1973) alongside Luc Miranda, Silvano Tranquilli and American actor Richard Conte…however he would not event make it out of the first act, such is his lucky.

This role however would set him off on a spate of eurocrime including an uncredited role in EXECUTION SQUAD (aka Le mano spietata delle legge; The Bloody Hands of the Law) in which he receives a blowtorch to the groin courtesy of the one and only Klaus Kinski. According to writer/director Mario Gariazzo this scene was somehow set to be even more violent but was shortened in order to appease both the producers and the ensure an easier ride with the censors.

Roles soon followed as part of the Comissario Betti films, first as a low life rapist in the 1975 film VIOLENT ROME before scoring a more substantial role in Umberto Lenzi’s follow up VIOLEN NAPLES in which Maurizio Merli reprised the role of Betti handing out judo chop after judo chop.

In VIOLENT NAPLES Luciano Rossi plays young thug Quasimodo who, as part of a small gang kidnap a married couple and rape the wife. This action all occurs near the start of the film and is the initial trigger for Comissario Betti to rally against the bureaucratic and restrictive system and culminates in a battle against John Saxon and the mob. Although that is not before the world’s worst escape attempt in which poor Quasimodo is impaled on a spike in an almost comedic manner. VIOLENT NAPLES proves that rarity of a sequel in that it actually manages to surpass the original with Luciano Rossi playing the small-time, loathsome criminal perfectly as ever.

Once again, the by now dare we say character actor, must have made a good on-set impression as Umberto Lenzi would also give him a part in his 1976 crime drama Il trucido e lo sbirro which was co-written by Umberto Lenzi and Lucio Fulci regular Dardano Sacchetti and stared another genre icon, this time in the shape of Tomas Milian.

Now Luciano Rossi was ever worried that he would be typecast as a low-level criminal he needn’t have worried as that another stereotype – a Nazi – would provide him with some variety. First briefly in SALON KITTY by Tinto Brass and then in Fabio De Agostini’s THE RED NIGHTS OF THE GESTAPO.

Based on a book by Bertha Uhland, the ridiculous plot sees a group of German industrialists try to overthrow Hitler . This film however is one for the dedicated only.

Unfortunately it was around this time that depression began to sink in, perhaps due to the frustration of always being the nearly man. Eventually the actors health began to give way as severe weight loss and muscular dystrophy took hold and the mid-to-late 70s marked the beginning of the end for Luciano Rossi.

The final act of Luciano Rossi’s career saw more brief roles in minor films, primarily in the ailing eurocrime genre with little of interest except perhaps the 1977 film CRIME BUSTERS starring former Django Terence Hill (who he featured alongside in THEY CALL ME TRINITY and DJANGO, PREPARE A COFFIN) and Bud Spencer.

It wouldn’t be until 1980 when, thanks to Lucio Fulci, Luciano Rossi would be back on the cinema screens thanks to CONTRABAND in which he played a chemist and in CITY OF THE LIVING DEAD, released the same year, where he played a policeman. Both very small roles but he is instantly recognisable if inconsequential.

Eventually Luciano Rossi would see out his career with roles in a few footnote films (HOTEL PARADISE; SANGRAAL; La spade di fuoco) culminating with the comedy LONG LIVE THE LADY! in 1987 which was the end of a deteriorating career that would parallel his health.

Having starred alongside and for many greats of the 1970s Italian film industry, many of which he would work alongside on multiple occasions it is a shame that someone who toiled away in the background so often and on so many entertaining and quality films would ultimately be remain overlooked struggling to get his due for many decades.

For whatever reason that breakthrough to the next level of success eluded him but thankfully now with the re-release of many classic and not so classic films he is finally, albeit posthumously, getting the attention that he deserves.

So next time you recognise that blonde haired, short little sleazeball or that chemist that the camera holds on for slightly too long think of Luciano Rossi and what a life he must have lived.

Brief note, depending on the film and the release you have Luciano Rossi may also be known by one of his anglicised pseudonyms such as Lou Kamante, Lucky Ros or Edward/Edwin Ross.